Tag Archives: sulley

What Big Tech Doesn’t Know Big Time

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They don’t talk.

They don’t write.

They don’t really like dealing with each other.

Yet, they need each other, need each other in a fundamental, all consuming way.  

We’re talking about Tech and Government, in case there was any question.  

And do you know how we know, how we know this?  

Because this is one of the things we do at How We Manage Stuff.  We have a small policy office on the unfashionable side of Capitol Hill that is led by Sulley, our Policy and PR Director.  From this vantage, Sulley and his staff help Tech leaders understand why they need government and Washington policy-makers appreciate that tech is not quite as frightening as they thought.

So we’ve got a new client – a hapless Tech Giant called T&S – and we’re about to start a new story.  It features Debbon Ayer as the CEO Abby Alton, Kit Kuksenok as the CTO genius Ed Kowalski, Margaux Amie as Senator Christine Stassen, and Geoffrey Grier as government administrator Morris Fitz.  

 But before we start this narrative, the head of our Washington Office, Sulley, walks down the median of Pennsylvania Avenue to explain what is about to happen.

And so the new series begins “What Big Tech Doesn’t Know” from the audio drama “How We Manage Stuff.”

 

Cast:

  • Sulley, HWMS Washington Director – Josh LaForce
  • Fan in a car – Jake Minevich 
  • Bicyclist  – Sarah Corbyn Woolf
  • Tour Guide  – Jake Minevich
  • Cop  – Jake Minevich

[19101]

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17330: Big Data in Bangalore

hwms.coverart Bangalore. Bengaluru. India’s High Tech Capital. If you’re gong to be a global podcast, you have to have an office somewhere near MG Road. The How We Manage Stuff team arrives in Bangalore – well most of it arrives in Bangalore – to find a place to work and to build a practice based on Big Data. Featuring:
  • Sonam Powar As Jameela, the Bangalore Office Manager
  • Margaux Amie as Evelyn, the Business Manager
  • Josh LaForce as Sulley, from Policy
  • Ron Bianchi as Bix, the Scrum Master
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17300: Technology and Organization and the Season Ahead

hwms.coverart What is next? As our cast rests on the How We Manage Stuff yacht in Puget Sound, it ponders the future and describes some of the story lines for the next season. As always, our goal is to teach lessons that are easy to discuss but hard to live. Hence, we will be looking at issues involving artificial intelligence, Agile software development, startup governance, and big data. We will open our new office in India, and start the discussion of the side effects of smart machines. The podcast How We Manage Stuff is grateful for the support and generosity of the United States Navy and the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry. No actual nuclear submarines were harmed in the production of this episode. Featuring:
  • Josh LaForce as Sulley, head of Policy
  • Margaux Amie as Evelyn the Business Manager
  • Zoe Anastassiou as Maddie the 8-Year-Old Entrepreneur
  • Mr. Skippy as himself
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17012: What to See at the Consumer Electronics Show

hwms.coverart What should you see at the Consumer Electronics Show? What are going to be the great cutting edge technologies that will shape the next 5 years of consumer products. We get some ideas from our special Tom Coughlin, who is one of the organizers of the technical side of the CES conference. Tom joins podcast staff members Sulley, the Policy Director and Jameela, the Manager of our Bangalore Office, to talk about the most important new technologies. (And, it appears, none of them are autonomous drone based coffee delivery systems.) Augmented Reality is probably on the top of the list, followed by Machine Intelligence and Virtual Reality. Tom will explain.   [17012]  Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

16920: Talking About Difficult Things: Saying “No”

hwms.coverart It is not enough to make good technology. You have to talk about it. You have to talk about it when it is good and when it is bad. The first is easy, to a point. The second is hard. How do you tell someone that their ideas are not working, that their plans have failed, that their vision of the world is incorrect? Evelyn and Sully give their lesson on the subject. Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail