16337: Governments and Innovative Technology, A Binge

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What do we expect to learn about innovation from a government? Why did we take the podcast to Washington? And why did we take an office next to the Capitol Power Plant, other than the obvious benefits that the rents are cheaper than the tonier stuff and yet we are still near the center of the action? All of this will be discussed in our binge episode, which combines three shorter pieces:

  • Who Are We and What Do We Do?
  • Open Source Discussions
  • It’s Agile but It’s Not Software

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16335: What Happens When the Bosses Are Gone?

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We know the answer to this question. You know the answer to it. You wouldn’t be looking at this page if you didn’t. The only questions are “How will the staff get themselves out of this mess?” and “How embarrassing will it be for them?” Click to find the answer.

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16330: Straddling the Divide – a Second Principle

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If you have a first principle then you have a second. This one concerns the leadership of Science Policy. We don’t require the leaders to be scientists. That would constrict our options and muddy a key idea. But we ask them to know what they are doing, something that our staff learns when the interview a candidate to be our policy director.

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16320: First Principles of Science Policy

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The first principle of science policy concerns money, though it has ramifications that are not as obvious as they might first seem. To explore the ramifications of science policy, we talk with Peggy Kidwell of the National Museum off American History and send Anna and Rohit in search of Google Server #1.

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16311: Essay Friday – Vannevar Bush & U. S. Science Policy

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This episode is a little different from our regular episodes with our regular cast. It is a short essay on Vannevar Bush, an essay about the origins of the fundamental ideas that guide how the U. S. Government deals with scientific research and scientific institutions. It is designed to give you a little deeper understanding of the relationship between science & government and to give you that understanding in just 10 minutes.

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16310: Bicoastal Innovation

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The podcast moves to our Washington offices in order to explore technology policy and how the Federal government can possibly be considered agile & innovative. Evelyn packs the office. Rohit adjusts the systems, Anna but Maddie is told that she has to stay home and go to school. All of this while we start to explore the basic principles of how a democratic government deals with technology and how it might be an agent of innovation while not being particularly innovative itself.

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Background:

vannevar bushIn this episode, we start exploring the ideas of Vannevar Bush, who articulated the basic principles that the U. S. Government follows when it deals with the scientific community. They are not perfect. They may not always work. But they have been fairly successful for the past 70 years.

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16305: It Makes You Feel Smarter

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Rohit explains why and how you should listen to “How We Manage Stuff.” “It you feel smarter,” he says, “And it also makes you feel at home.” This is a quick summery before we start the next series. The hosts are out of the office. Anna the Intern is at PANIC, the Professional Assistants, Networkers, and Interns Conference. Next week, a new series that looks at how government policy shapes software develops

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16275: A Binge for My Baby and a Binge for the Road

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A Binge episode for the end of April. Three combined podcasts. The first talks about context, how we think about development questions and whether our office manager has offended the host. The second: Position, Status & Function. The three elements of human organization. The last is a discussion of open source development and how open source affects our organizations.

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