16165: The Binge – Don Shafer, The Cycle of Continuous Improvement, Pierre Bourque

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A binge of three episodes.  A binge for your workout.  A binge for your commute.  Or just a binge to catch up on the episodes that you missed.

This binge has three episodes from the fall.  In the first Don Shafer of the Athens group talks about deadlines and why software projects can run late.  In the second , Rohit our overly enthusiastic IT guy, explains why Walter P Shewhart, the inventor of the cycle of continuous improvement is so important.  In the last, Pierre Bourque tells us about the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge and why you should know about it, even if you don’t use it.

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Episode 16140: People, Lines and Boxes

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What happens to an organization when you introduce a new technology?

Before we answer that question, we listen to a public services announcement from Anna, the intern. She feels that she knows what we need to know, and she is going to give us that information whether we like it or not.

We think of technology as changing the position or function of workers. This is true but it also changes the status of workers as well. Status is not merely the standing of an individual in a group. It measures communication, effectiveness and charisma (a quality that Anna particularly loves.) While technology changes position and function in predictable ways, it can produce unanticipated changes on status. It can even bring an intern and her little dog into prominence.

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Background

The ideas in this episode come from the work of Frank Levy and Richard Murnane, The new division of labor : how computers are creating the next job market,  Princeton University Press, c2004; as well as the classic ideas of Peter Drucker, The new society; the anatomy of the industrial order, Harper, 1950.

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Episode 16160: Guest Daryl Belock of Thermo-Fisher Scientific

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Agile. We think of it as a way of developing software. Or managing projects. It came from the auto industry. Toyota to be exact. Yet, we are still a little surprised when we see it used to develop physical goods. In this episode, Guest Daryl Belock of Thermo-Fisher Scientific tells us how he uses Agile methods in his work.

Of course, this happens only after Anna the Intern discovers that Agile methods have nothing to do with corporations.
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Episode 16150: What We Are & What We Do

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Smart. Informed. Humorous. Every episode should make you feel a little smarter, a bit better informed and, perhaps, that you can laugh at the foibles of the world. Today, Tamara and David talk about the goals of the podcast and show how it can work for you.

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Episode 16130: Know Your Context

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Is there an Agile Governance? We think of Agile development as occurring on the project or operations level. Yet projects take place in a bigger context, one that is shaped by boards and financing and strategies. In this episode, the How We Manage Stuff talks about how the “ravings of filthy rich ego-maniacs” shape his work and ultimately the work of a company as well.

This episode introduces Tom Woteki as Gerald the Board Chair.

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Background: Context Maps
context-maps
Context Map
A Context Map lets you begin converging on the top eight themes or dimensions of a particular topic or opportunity space.  By knowing these dimensions, you can ask the right questions that prompt a more informed search for promising innovation opportunities.
You can find more  about this tool in Tamara Carleton’s Playbook for Strategic Foresight and Innovation .
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Gerald-the-Board-Chair’s application of the Context Map
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Episode 16120: The Unnamed Episode with Guest Tiffany Norwood

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What happens when you are developing big technology? Perhaps you are helping to build a global radio network. How do requirements emerge? How do you respond? This week’s guest helps us to understand these issues. It is Tiffany Norwood, who was part of the Worldspace team, the startup that became the company now known as XM-Sirius.

 

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Background:

The founding of XM radio has been the subject of a well-known series of Case Studies by faculty that the Harvard Business School.

Godes, David B.   (07/01/2003).  XM Satellite Radio (A). Harvard Business School Cases.  p. 1 – 25.

Godes, David B., and Elie Ofek. “XM Satellite Radio (B).” Harvard Business School Supplement 504-065, January 2004. (Revised March 2004.)

Godes, David B., and Elie Ofek. “XM Satellite Radio (C): The Next Generation of Radio Receivers.” Harvard Business School Case 505-015, September 2004. (Revised August 2007.)

The NAACP Magazine The New Crisis has a profile on Worldspace founder Noah Samara.  It helps to give a richer view of the founding of XM radio. 

 

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Episode 16110: Where do we go from here?

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This is a podcast about technology, about organizations and about people. In this episode, the office staff meet to talk about the goals for the next season, the guests that will be featured, and the things they have accomplished over the last weeks.

Also, Anna the Internet makes an appeal to Elon Musk to help her be the host of the next Binge episode

 

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Episode 16105: What does the future hold?

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This week. “How We Manage Stuff” is podcasting live at the Consumer Electronic Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Of course, you need to remember that podcasting is not a live medium. That is called “streaming” and we don’t do it yet.) We take a quick look at the CES booths and try to determine the important new technology for the year.

 

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