Tag Archives: technology policy

16385: Leaving Washington: A summary of science & tech policy

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The time has come to move to our next site. Before we go, we do a quick summary of what we have learned about Science & Technology Policy while Maddie, our 8-year old entrepreneur shows us how she has actually applied it.

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16340: The Third Principle of Governments & Science – and a visit to the Duke

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The Third principle of governments and science. It is the most familiar and the least understood. Vannevar Bush argued that governments should do research by contract, not by building independent labs. We will look at that idea and ask how well it works, in application and in breech.

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16330: Straddling the Divide – a Second Principle

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If you have a first principle then you have a second. This one concerns the leadership of Science Policy. We don’t require the leaders to be scientists. That would constrict our options and muddy a key idea. But we ask them to know what they are doing, something that our staff learns when the interview a candidate to be our policy director.

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16310: Bicoastal Innovation

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The podcast moves to our Washington offices in order to explore technology policy and how the Federal government can possibly be considered agile & innovative. Evelyn packs the office. Rohit adjusts the systems, Anna but Maddie is told that she has to stay home and go to school. All of this while we start to explore the basic principles of how a democratic government deals with technology and how it might be an agent of innovation while not being particularly innovative itself.

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Background:

vannevar bushIn this episode, we start exploring the ideas of Vannevar Bush, who articulated the basic principles that the U. S. Government follows when it deals with the scientific community. They are not perfect. They may not always work. But they have been fairly successful for the past 70 years.

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